"Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder."

— Rumi (via thecalminside)

"Peace is within oneself to be found in the same place as agitation and suffering. It is not found in a forest or on a hilltop, nor is it given by a teacher. Where you experience suffering, you can also find freedom from suffering. Trying to run away from suffering is actually to run toward it."

— Ajahn Chah (via thecalminside)

(Source: psych-facts)

poetrysociety:

Submit to our next round of Annual Awards starting October 1st.Annual Awards judges include:Stephen Burt, Honorée Jeffers, Fady Joudah, Dana Levin, Ange Mlinko, Jim Moore, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Alan Shapiro, and Rachel Zucker. Chapbook judges will be:Marilyn Chin, Jane Hirshfield, A. Van Jordan, and Don PatersonFor guidelines see our website.

poetrysociety:

Submit to our next round of Annual Awards starting October 1st.

Annual Awards judges include:

Stephen BurtHonorée JeffersFady JoudahDana LevinAnge Mlinko, Jim Moore, Aimee NezhukumatathilAlan Shapiro, and Rachel Zucker. 

Chapbook judges will be:

Marilyn Chin, Jane Hirshfield, A. Van Jordan, and Don Paterson

For guidelines see our website.

(via tiaraless)

drsohm:

Sex in the Sink: gene swapping bacteria are making new superbugs (NBC News)

Bacteria appear to be having the microbial equivalent of inter-species sex in hospital sinks, swapping chunks of DNA that render them impervious to antibiotics, researchers reported Wednesday.
The findings may help explain the rise in drug-resistant “superbugs” in hospitals, and they suggest that they may sometimes be breeding on site, as opposed to being carried in by patients.







The team at the National Institutes of Health found carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) that appeared to have exchanged pieces of genetic material called plasmids that gave them resistance to antibiotics. CRE resist most, if not all antibiotics, and they are becoming more common: they are found in about 4 percent of hospitals now and 18 percent of long-term care facilities.

Yep…bacteria will do it anywhere

drsohm:

Sex in the Sink: gene swapping bacteria are making new superbugs (NBC News)

Bacteria appear to be having the microbial equivalent of inter-species sex in hospital sinks, swapping chunks of DNA that render them impervious to antibiotics, researchers reported Wednesday.

The findings may help explain the rise in drug-resistant “superbugs” in hospitals, and they suggest that they may sometimes be breeding on site, as opposed to being carried in by patients.

The team at the National Institutes of Health found carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) that appeared to have exchanged pieces of genetic material called plasmids that gave them resistance to antibiotics. CRE resist most, if not all antibiotics, and they are becoming more common: they are found in about 4 percent of hospitals now and 18 percent of long-term care facilities.

Yep…bacteria will do it anywhere

(via currentsinbiology)

23pairsofchromosomes:

10 Near Indestructible Creatures!

That may hold the key to all anti-ageing science…

(via currentsinbiology)

currentsinbiology:

medicalstate:

Tapeworm parasitic infection following daily sashimi diet for years.

The initial complaint this Chinese man presented with were a stomach ache and itchy skin. After further testing, the doctors came to the discovery that his body had been completely invaded with tapeworm parasites. 

The encysted larvae were embedded deep within the man’s tissues, save for his brain, which would have resulted in the more serious complication of neurocysticercosis.

This man turned out to be an avid sushi eater and ate raw sashimi on an almost daily basis for years. 

What???????

(Source: Daily Mail)

currentsinbiology:

An apple a day could keep obesity away
Scientists at Washington State University have concluded that nondigestible compounds in apples – specifically, Granny Smith apples – may help prevent disorders associated with obesity. The study, thought to be the first to assess these compounds in apple cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest, appears in October’s print edition of the journal Food Chemistry.

"We know that, in general, apples are a good source of these nondigestible compounds but there are differences in varieties," said food scientist Giuliana Noratto, the study’s lead researcher. "Results from this study will help consumers to discriminate between apple varieties that can aid in the fight against obesity."

The tart green Granny Smith apples benefit the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon due to their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates. Despite being subjected to chewing, stomach acid and digestive enzymes, these compounds remain intact when they reach the colon. Once there, they are fermented by bacteria in the colon, which benefits the growth of friendly bacteria in the gut.

currentsinbiology:

An apple a day could keep obesity away

Scientists at Washington State University have concluded that nondigestible compounds in apples – specifically, Granny Smith apples – may help prevent disorders associated with obesity. The study, thought to be the first to assess these compounds in apple cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest, appears in October’s print edition of the journal Food Chemistry.

"We know that, in general, apples are a good source of these nondigestible compounds but there are differences in varieties," said food scientist Giuliana Noratto, the study’s lead researcher. "Results from this study will help consumers to discriminate between apple varieties that can aid in the fight against obesity."

The tart green Granny Smith apples benefit the growth of friendly bacteria in the colon due to their high content of non-digestible compounds, including dietary fiber and polyphenols, and low content of available carbohydrates. Despite being subjected to chewing, stomach acid and digestive enzymes, these compounds remain intact when they reach the colon. Once there, they are fermented by bacteria in the colon, which benefits the growth of friendly bacteria in the gut.

cogging:

my friend told me how electricity is measured and i was like watt

(via fake-mermaid)